Tag Archives: Southern Cooking

Vegetarian Quesadilla

I like to serve my family vegetarian meals a time or two a week.

1- Because they are cheaper

and

2- With the garden coming in, I need to use up some of these veggies!

 

Vegetarian Quesadilla- SouthernGalsCook.com

Here is what you will need:

Vegetarian Quesadilla- SouthernGalsCook.com

8- 8 inch tortillas

2 tbsp butter

2 tbsp your favorite cooking oil (I used bacon grease, but you can use e.v. olive oil or butter)

1 cup shredded cheese (I used what I had which was mozzarella and colby jack)

1 medium sweet onion- diced

1 medium summer squash- diced  **Surprise!** (Don’t worry! My kids and hubby didn’t notice! They just kept saying “Mmmmm! This is good!”)

1 medium green pepper- seeded and diced (I used half of the large bell)

15 oz canned black beans- rinsed and drained

1 tsp garlic powder or 1 tbsp fresh garlic- minced

1/2 tsp onion powder

1/2 tsp cumin

salt and pepper to taste

Vegetarian Quesadilla- SouthernGalsCook.com

1. In a skillet over medium high heat, begin to saute your onion in bacon grease.

Once your onions began to look translucent…

Vegetarian Quesadilla- SouthernGalsCook.com

2. …add bell peppers. Saute for a few minutes, stirring occasionally. You will notice that the peppers will start taking on a “tender” appearance.

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3. Add your squash. Stir and continue to saute your veggies. Season lightly with salt and pepper. I find that these veggies taste better when seasoned while cooking.

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4. When your veggies are tender and your onion is almost transparent, add your beans, garlic, cumin, and onion powder. You will also add a little more salt and pepper, as well as a couple of tbsp of water or broth (chicken or veggie). The beans are very starchy and the liquid helps to loosen your mixture a little. Taste for seasoning and adjust as you like.

5. Stir and let simmer on a low heat while you begin to prepare your griddle for quesadilla magic.

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6. Over medium high heat, melt a 1/2 tbsp of butter (I found a half tbsp was enough for 2 quesadillas). put down your tortilla to coat with butter on one side. Add 1/2 cup of your bean mixture to one half of your tortilla. Cover with 2 tbsp of cheese. Fold. Allow to cook for about 2 minutes or until your tortilla is golden brown. Carefully flip and brown the other side.

Serve with your favorite dressings. We had sour cream and garden tomatoes. SO GOOD! You could add cilantro to the bean mixture— if you like that sort of thing. *gag* You could also add mushrooms, corn, zucchini, jalapenos… This is a great way to use some of your garden veggies.

Yum

Even though my kids are good eaters, they are funny about squash. They LOVED these and wanted seconds. This meal is frugal, healthy, quick (less than 20 minutes), and yummy.

CheesyQ

Queso for days!

I hope you give this a try and I hope that you love it as much as my little family did.

Let us know if you tried it and how you changed it up for your family.

Help, we need somebody! Help, not just anybody! Help, you know we need someone, help!

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Do the altered lyrics in our title for this post sound familiar?

Yep, you guessed it!

The Beatles, HELP, released July 1965!

Okay, enough trivia!

 

We at SGC need help from our readers!  Help in finding out how we are doing on our blog.

We ask that you please take a moment to answer a few questions and express your opinion.  Please be honest, courteous and constructive with your feedback.

To thank you for your time you will have a chance to win this cookbook!  But, you can’t win if you don’t participate!

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You have until July 14 to complete the survey.  Once you have taken the survey just leave your name and e-mail address in the Leave a Comments section located at the top of this post.  (Don’t worry, it’s not a trick. We will not share your e-mail, we will only use it to contact you if you win).  We will choose, at random, a winner on July 15.

Thanks and God Bless,

SGC

READY, SET, GO …………

Roots- A Brief History Lesson on Southern Cuisine

I’m kind of a nerd. I start thinking about things and wonder how they started, where they came from, who made it, why, why is it called what it is– and then I study. Not because I have a project due or a deadline, but because I’m a curious person that likes to learn.

A couple of years ago someone asked me what my favorite kind of food was. I jokingly responded, “The kind you eat.” The thing is, I’m not a picky eater by any stretch of the imagination. I’m very adventurous when it comes to trying new foods. After I giggled at my smart aleck remark, I answered seriously with, “home-style southern food”. If you put a five-star restaurant plate with something exotic and beautiful next to a plate with collard greens ‘n ham hocks, fried fat back, corn bread, and black-eyed peas, then told me to pick a plate–I’d go for the latter.

Sweet Tea- SouthernGalsCook.com

Click for recipe

I got to wondering about why Southern cooking is different from other places in the country and where our southern food traditions come from. So, being the nerd I am, I got to reading up on a little Southern Cuisine history.

As I figured, influences stemmed from the multicultural population, crops, livestock, wild game, and necessity. After all, necessity is the mother of invention. Is it not?

The influential multicultural groups included African, English, Scottish, Irish, and Native American, just to name a few.  Not only did their style of cooking form our roots of southern cuisine, but also the ingredients that they brought with them from their native homes largely affected the culinary style we know today. The BIGGEST influences of Southern food, in my opinion, were the Africans. I’ll get more into this in a minute.

Because the growing season weather is hot and humid, and because most of the dirt in the south is clay, some crops thrived in the south while others had to be imported from surrounding regions.

Southern Cornbread

Click for the recipe

Now, the part that I found to be the most interesting was the huge influences that the slaves had on the foods that I love so much. One of the things that I read told how the slave owners would give the slaves the parts of the butchered pigs that they found inedible, such as pig ears, pig’s feet, ham hocks, etc. The Africans would use those piggie parts to season their cooking. That is why, still to this day, we cook down a mess of greens with a pork product. They also breaded some vegetables and fish in cornmeal, such as squash, okra, and catfish, then deep-fried them in pork grease. {Yum!} They introduced okra, black-eyed peas, and many other things to the Southern table.

Roots- A Brief History Lesson on Southern Cuisine

Greens- A Southern Staple

Barbecue is a Southern tradition that can be traced to our Native American ancestors. Barbecue varies in every region and every region “has the best and only way to eat bbq!” HAHA! I’m not kidding! People get crazy competitive {and snobby!} with it! Everything from the wood used to smoke it, the sauce to baste it, the rub to massage it, and the way to cut it is up for debate! Don’t even get me started on the different sauces!

Our love of pies and cobblers go back to our European ancestors that showed us amazing things that can be done with flour, butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and imported vanilla and cocoa.

Peach Cobbler- SouthernGalsCook.com

Click for the recipe

I enjoy knowing my Southern heritage. I like knowing why we do the things we do. I love being Southern. I’ve enjoyed sharing with you. And, as the southern comedienne, Minnie Pearl, would say “I’m just so proud to be here”.

DRUM ROLL PLEASE………… AND THE WINNER OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY HAT CONTEST IS ………………..

2 Corinthians 9:15 Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift. 

2 Corinthians 1:11 Ye also helping together by prayer for us, that for the gift bestowed upon us by the means of many persons thanks may be given by many on our behalf.

WE HAVE A WINNER, WINNER, CHICKEN DINNER!!

CONGRATULATIONS CHERYL CASTEEL YOU ARE OUR WINNER!  You will receive a 1-years subscription to TASTE OF HOME magazine

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Thanks to Cheryl and all those who subscribe to our blog, like us on Facebook, follows us on Twitter and pins us on Pinterest, we are forever grateful.  Without our peeps we could not do this!

Cheryl, please e-mail your address to southerngalscook@yahoo.com to receive your subscription.  Don’t worry, we will NOT share your information with anyone else.

This was fun!!!!!  Can’t wait to do it again, and we will.

SGC

Southern Sausage Gravy

“Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.” Matthew 5:13

I’ve noticed that foods that I consider “comfort foods” are those that take me back to my childhood. My Mom’s pineapple upside-down cake, my Pop’s manicotti, and my Grandmother Bryson’s sausage gravy and biscuits.

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Taking a bite of this gravy is like stepping into a time machine, dialing the time of arrival to 1983 when I was 3 years old, and stepping into her kitchen. I remember standing on a stool next to her while she let me pat out the biscuits and put them in her baking pan.

Even though I was a pretty good cook when I got married, I did my best to recreate the foods that my loved ones served, to my new husband.

Gravy was one thing that I had to attempt several times before I got the consistency just right. There were times that I served my husband gravy so thick and pasty we could have spackled dry wall with it. There were other times that the gravy looked more like a creamy soup. But now, lucky for him, I’ve got it just right.

To make this Southern Sausage Gravy, you will need:

1 lb bulk sausage

3 1/2 tbsp all-purpose flour

2 1/2 cups whole milk {I’ve used 2% and it’s fine, I just prefer whole milk}

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

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Step 1: Heat your skillet over medium high heat. Crumble your sausage into your skillet and cook to a golden brown. DO NOT DRAIN YOUR GREASE! This is the fat you need to make this dish.

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Step 2: Thoroughly incorporate your flour, salt and pepper. Stir and cook for about a minute being sure scrap the bottom of your skillet. The flour can stick and burn if you aren’t careful. {I find using a whisk and a cast iron skillet are the best tools for this job.}

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Step 3: Vigorously stirring with your whisk, pour in your milk. Stirring continually will work out any lumps giving you a smooth, creamy texture. Continue to stir and cook for a couple of minutes or until your gravy is the perfect, velvety consistency.

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Step 5: Serve over Dana’s amazing biscuits to some of your favorite people.

Enjoy!

SGravy8SGC

 

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